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Two Sorbets: Mango-Strawberry and Lemongrass-Tamarind.

July 28th, 2008 · 2 Comments

Making sorbet is easy. All you need is some kind of fruit, sugar, water, and a little bit of lime juice. And in summer – at least in our house – having something sweet, refreshing and ice cold is an absolute necessity.

We recently made two kinds of sorbet at the same time – a mango strawberry sorbet (very loosely based on this recipe) and a lemongrass tamarind sorbet (based on this one). Mangoes and lemongrass are things we had handy. If you’ve got peaches or mint (or any kind of fruity thing, or any kind of leafy thing), you could easily switch the recipes around a little.

Mango-Strawberry Sorbet Ingredients

  • 1/2-inch ginger
  • 2 large mangoes, peeled & chunked
  • 1 cup frozen strawberries (more or less)
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar
  • Juice of one lime

Lemongrass-Tamarind Sorbet Ingredients

  • 1/2-inch ginger
  • Three stems lemongrass, chopped fine
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 3 cups water
  • 1 egg-sized lump frozen tamarind pulp (substitute juice of 1 lime)
  • Juice of 1/2 lime
Because we approach sorbet making a lot like the making of smoothies, we start with ginger – about half an inch of a root for each recipe, chopped and mashed. Daughter likes using a steel measuring cup as a hammer, while we enjoy cleaning flecks of mashed ginger off the walls.
Make a simple syrup by bringing water to the boil and mixing in sugar until it dissolves. Add ginger. For the lemongrass sorbet, you’d simmer the lemongrass in the syrup for 5 minutes, then remove from heat and add tamarind. Let cool.
Blend the fruit, add the lime and syrup (straining out the solids). Let sit for 10 minutes or so.
At this point, you could just put the puree + syrup in a pan in the freezer, then break it up and refreeze. Or, you can get your 30-year-old ice cream maker out of the storeroom, head to the porch, put the puree in the tub and the tub inside the bucket and start spinning!
Make sure your ice is in manageable chunks. Break the bigger ones. With gusto. Add layers of ice and salt as the tub spins. The more salt, the colder it gets, so don’t overfreeze it – four Tablespoons should do.
After 25 minutes or so, the contents of the tub will be soft-frozen. Scoop into a container and freeze until it’s hard. If you’re doing two batches, wash the tub and reuse the same icy brine with a little new ice.


Eat and enjoy!

Tags: Desserts · Other fun

2 responses so far ↓

  • 1 S // Jul 29, 2008 at 1:49 pm

    This is priceless: Daughter likes using a steel measuring cup as a hammer, while we enjoy cleaning flecks of mashed ginger off the walls.

    Thanks for the big smile!

  • 2 Nai Nai // Aug 1, 2008 at 3:05 am

    Lovely old Ice Cream Maker. Where does one get get such a marvel?